Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 19, 2015

Corn Dodgers-Lincoln Style

IMG_1195-001   As per Dennis Hanks (cousin of Abraham Lincoln):  “Seems to me now I never seen Abe after he was twelve that he didn’t have a book in his hand or in his pocket.  He’d put a book inside his shirt an’ fill his pants pockets with corn dodgers an’ go off to plow or how.  When noon came he’s set under a tree an’ read an’ eat.”  These corn dodgers were made with coarsely ground corn mixed with hot water, salt and a very small amount of butter and fried until very brown and hard.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 18, 2015

Brown Crust Envelopes

IMG_1202-001  When the cooked hominy, stored in the stoneware crock,  is wanted for meals, it is fried with a little butter or lard until a brown crust envelopes the whole mass.  It is best taken with good butter.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 17, 2015

Like Mush

IMG_1189-003  After the corn had soaked in the lye and each grain cracked, there were several rinsings required in clear water to release hulls and remove lye residue.  The lyed corn is then cooked with a little salt and a lot of water for three to four hours in a pot.  “It is a very nice dish served up hot out of the boiling kettle taken with butter or eaten with milk like mush.”  But it was advised to store most of the cooked hominy in a stone vessel to fry or bake later.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 16, 2015

Hominy-Prairie Farmer Style

IMG_1204-001  The Union Agriculturist and Western Prairie Farmer first published in 1841 was written  for farmers with information from farmers living on western lands.  There are similarities and differences with the traditional nixtimalization process.  The first step is to make a lye solution with ash but the corn is only soaked 15 to 20 minutes.  After soaking, the corn was pounded.  “This beating is perfected when the grains are divested of the skin and each grain is cracked. We do not admire beat fine.”

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 15, 2015

Lincoln and Corn

IMG_1187-001  On this 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Lincoln, I am posting this picture of the program at Mercer Museum that was presented in a very cold log cabin President’s Day 2015.  There was snow and ice in the small hearth when I arrived that was stubborn to melt even with a fire started.  Corn was the predominant crop in Kentucky and Indiana when Abe was a boy and it provided food for humans and animals. Thomas Lincoln (Abe’s Father) had to leave behind 40 bushels of corn in Kentucky when Abe was 7 when he moved the family to Indiana.  The table is set for the production of corn dodgers and hominy.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 14, 2015

Currant Taert

IMG_0963-001   Another taert prepared with the receipt (recipe) for To make Dough for Taerten was To make a Currant Taert.  The Dutch receipt reads as translated by Peter Rose:  Take the most beautiful Currants and when you have made the crust sprinkle enough Sugar on the bottom to cover it, place a layer of Currents on it and then again a layer of Sugar until the curst is filled, not forgetting the Cinnamon, cover it and bake until done.  As this tart was prepared in January, currents that had been preserved in sugar were used.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 11, 2015

Pear-taert

IMG_0960-001  Some of the To make Dough for Taerten was used for the Dutch receipt (recipe), To make a Pear-taertTake 12 of the tastiest, peeled Pears, Currants, and Sugar of each a quarter pond, 6 loot Butter, Ginger, Cinnamon of each a half loot in a crust.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 8, 2015

Dough for Taerten

IMG_0950   Several Dutch taerts (tarts) will be made from these resting receipts (recipes) for To make Dough for Taerten.  Peter Rose’s translation of the receipt reads:  Take Wheat-flour, Butter, Rosewater, Sugar and a few Eggs each as appropriate.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 7, 2015

Oil of Olives

IMG_0993-001  After the cauliflower was cooked until well done in a pudding bag and stewed with Mutton broth and some Pepper, Oil of Olives was poured over it for the Dutch receipt (recipe), To stew Cauliflower.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 4, 2015

The Bag Answer

IMG_0956-001   There are two pudding bags (squares of linen cloth tied with string) in the kettle being used to cook the cauliflower until well done after it has been cleaned for the Dutch receipt (recipe), To stew Cauliflower.

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