Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 27, 2016

Balance the Sugar

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For the receipt (recipe), To make Gooseberry Tarts, balance scales are used to weigh a quarter of a pound of sugar.  The receipt gives directions for the preparation of the gooseberries for the tart but no mention of preparing the tarts at all.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 23, 2016

To Preserve Gooseberries

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The gooseberries for the receipt (recipe) To preserve Gooseberries need to stand uncovered on a chafing dish of coals a pretty while but not too long as to grow red and you must put the rest of the Sugar on them as they boil, and that will harden them and keep them from breaking.  When they be enough put them up.  I have put mine up in a gally pot.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 17, 2016

Set on Chafing Dish

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After the sugar, gooseberries and two spoonfuls of water have been laid in a pewter dish for the receipt (recipe) To preserve Gooseberries, then set the Gooseberries on a chafing dish of coals and let them stand uncovered, scalding upon the fire a pretty while before they boil, but not too long as they will grow red.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 12, 2016

Gooseberries One by One

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After the best part of the Sugar was in the bottom of my pewter basin for the receipt (recipe). To preserve Gooseberries, then lay your Gooseberries one by one upon it, strew some of the rest of the Sugar upon them, and put two spoonfuls of the water, into a half a pound.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 11, 2016

Sugar in Pewter Dish

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After equal weight of sugar as gooseberries has been weighed for the receipt (recipe), To preserve Gooseberries, lay the best part of the Sugar in the bottom of a silver or pewter dish.  I am using a pewter basin and have laid in more than half of the sugar that was weighed.  The chafing dish that I will be using is to the right of the basin.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 10, 2016

The Weight in Sugar

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After I three or four holes have been pricked in every gooseberry for the receipt (recipe), To preserve Gooseberries, then take the weight of them in Sugar.  Pictured are my balance scales with sugar in the left pan and gooseberries in the right.  Sugar is added until the pans are balanced.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 3, 2016

Prick Holes

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After obtaining the fairest Gooseberries you can get  with stalks on, the next step for the receipt (recipe) To preserve Gooseberries, is to prick three or four holes in every one of them.  I am using a pin to prick the holes in the berry.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | August 1, 2016

The Fairest Gooseberries

IMG_1120-001For the receipt (recipe) To preserve Gooseberries, the first step is to take the fairest Gooseberries you can get with the stalks on.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 30, 2016

Called Also Feapberry

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Nicholas Culpeper,  an early English 17th century physician, wrote about the Gooseberry Bush, called also Feapberry …Dewberry…and WineberryThe berries , when they are unripe, being scalded or baked, are good to stir up a fainting or delayed appetite.  You may keep them preserved in sugar all the year long.   The ripe Gooseberries being eaten, are an excellent remedy to allay the violent heat both of the stomach and liver.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 25, 2016

Open Sesame

IMG_1203-001My first sesame flowers opened on my first plants of Sesamum indicum (sesame) from Monticello seeds with my goal of pressing sesame oil which Thomas Jefferson thought was so perfect a substitute for olive oil.

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