Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 27, 2021

Apples Chopt Small-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

After the potatoes were beat in a mortar for the receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding some Summer Rambo apples were chopt small with a rocker knife.

After the potatoes were beat in a mortar for the receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding some Summer Rambo apples were chopt small with a rocker knife.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 23, 2021

Beat in a Mortar-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

After the potatoes were roasted and peeled for the receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding: Another Way, then beat them in a Mortar.

After the potatoes were roasted and peeled for the receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding: Another Way, then beat them in a Mortar.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 21, 2021

Potato for Potato Pudding-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

Instead of boiling potatoes for the 1744 receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding, the potatoes were baked relatively quickly on the hot hearth with established embers.

Instead of boiling potatoes for the 1744 receipt (recipe) To make Potato-Pudding, the potatoes were baked relatively quickly on the hot hearth with established embers.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 19, 2021

Rambour Franc-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

Rambour Franc is a 16th century heirloom apple of French origin that became popular in the American colonies.  The apple was referred to as Summer Rambour in this country and changed to Summer Rambo by the 1850's.  With a bushel of Summer Rambo on my porch, I will be using them in receipts (recipes).

Summer Rambo Apples

Rambour Franc is a 16th century heirloom apple of French origin that became popular in the American colonies.  The apple was referred to as Summer Rambour in this country and changed to Summer Rambo by the 1850’s.  With a bushel of Summer Rambo on my porch, I will be using them in receipts (recipes).

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 17, 2021

Green Corn Bread-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

Three folded, and filled packets of green corn bread were prepared from one ear of Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green or milk stage.  The bread requires two leaves from the corn plant filled with the flavorful, milky green corn scraped from the cob.  The bread will bake in the embers of the main fire.

Three folded, and filled packets of green corn bread were prepared from one ear of Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green or milk stage.  The bread requires two leaves from the corn plant filled with the flavorful, milky green corn scraped from the cob.  The bread will bake in the embers of the main fire.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 15, 2021

Filling and Folding the Leaves-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

After all the milky kernels have been cut from the ear of Puhwem green corn (Lenape white flour corn in the green or milk stage), leaves from the plant are harvested and filled and folded per the account recorded by John Heckewelder to make green corn bread.

After all the milky kernels have been cut from the ear of Puhwem green corn (Lenape white flour corn in the green or milk stage), leaves from the plant are harvested and filled and folded per the account recorded by John Heckewelder to make green corn bread.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 13, 2021

Milky Kernels-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

When Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) is green corn the kernels are filled with milky white juices that are concentrated corn flavor.  I am using my jaspar knife to remove the kernels from the cob to prepare green corn bread.  Note all the splatters of "milk" in my bowl and on my finger.

When Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) is green corn the kernels are filled with milky white juices that are concentrated corn flavor.  I am using my jaspar knife to remove the kernels from the cob to prepare green corn bread.  Note all the splatters of “milk” in my bowl and on my finger.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 9, 2021

Green Corn-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

After the silks of the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green or milk stage were harvested for drying, the green husks were carefully put back in place and tied with a piece of a corn leaf.  In the foreground of the picture, two ears are soaking, one is tied and in the trade kettle boiling and one is tied and roasting supported by a roasting stick.

After the silks of the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green or milk stage were harvested for drying, the green husks were carefully put back in place and tied with a piece of a corn leaf.  In the foreground of the picture, two ears are soaking, one is tied and in the trade kettle boiling and one is tied and roasting supported by a roasting stick.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 7, 2021

Drying Puhwem Silks-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

The silks harvested from the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) were placed in a grape vine basket on my drying rack for drying.

The silks harvested from the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) were placed in a grape vine basket on my drying rack for drying.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 3, 2021

Harvesting Silks-A Taste of Hearth Cooking

After husking the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green stage, the silks are harvested.  The silks are full of nutrients.  There is one silk for pollinating each kernel from the tassels of the corn stalks.  If a kernel is not developed on an ear, it did not get pollinated.

After husking the Puhwem (Lenape white flour corn) in the green stage, the silks are harvested.  The silks are full of nutrients.  There is one silk for pollinating each kernel from the tassels of the corn stalks.  If a kernel is not developed on an ear, it did not get pollinated.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

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