Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 26, 2017

Tin Baker-Browning

Because a tin baker relying on reflective heat from the fire was used to bake the Shaker receipt (recipe), Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake, the graniteware pan has to be turned to try to obtain an even browning.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 24, 2017

Baking Small Cakes

To bake the Shaker receipt (recipe) for Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake, a graniteware pan in my tin baker was used to prepare small cakes for sampling.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 20, 2017

Fold the Beaten Whites

The twelve egg whites beaten with a handful of peach twigs to impart a delicate peach flavor, were lightly folded into the batter of butter, sugar flour, cornstarch, baking powder, milk and vanilla for the Shaker receipt (recipe), Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 17, 2017

Birch Instead of Peach Twigs

Even though the Shaker receipt (recipe) for Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake, directed the use of  a handful of peach twigs to beat the eggs to impart a delicate peach flavor to the cake, I left my bruised peach twigs for the public to smell and used my birch twig whisk to beat the dozen egg whites.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 14, 2017

Cut a Handful of Peach Twigs

The date was April 1 but inside the cabin for the Shaker Your Plate program it was March 1 and Mother Ann’s birthday was being celebrated.  Mother Ann was born February 29, 1736.  The original receipt (recipe) for Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake reads:  “Cut a handful of peach twigs, which are filled with sap at this time of year.  Clip the ends and bruise them and beat cake batter with them.  This will impart a delicate peach flavor to the cake.”  My bruised peach twigs are pictured on the table.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 12, 2017

200 Strokes in All

After the challenge of creaming butter and sugar in a very cold cabin for the receipt (recipe), Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake, the flour with cornstarch and baking powder was added in small amounts alternately with milk to the butter mixture.  The receipt states: Beat after each addition, 200 strokes in all.  Shaker receipts are precise and written to produce the best product possible.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 10, 2017

Too Cold to Cream

The first step in the preparation of the Shaker receipt (recipe), Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake, is to beat butter and sugar into a smooth cream.  The butter was to be the best sweet butter, fresh if possible.   Even though the program was April 1st, it was so cold in the cabin that the bowl of butter and sugar needed to be placed in a warmer location so it could be beaten.  Notice the stiff  batter with the spoon standing!

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 9, 2017

Shaker Your Plate

This is my demonstration table complete with my Shaker chair, Shaker egg basket and many Shaker boxes for my Shaker Your Plate program.  The receipt (recipe) I am preparing is Mother Ann’s Birthday Cake.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 6, 2017

Puff Paste Lid

The receipt (recipe) for To bake Chicken for to be eaten cold  baked in a coffin with lid, now is ready for presentation to table with its adorned puff paste lid replacement.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | April 5, 2017

Coffin Lid Removed

When the baking lid for the coffin filled with the receipt (recipe), To bake Chicken for to be eaten cold, the clarified butter (that had been poured through the hole in the lid) was congealed and sealing most of the chicken.

Visit my website at:   www.hearttohearthcookery.com

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