Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 12, 2011

Confectioners Extraordinaire!

Teaching a Confectionery Workshop

Today in 105 degree heat, ten stalwart students, (including Kimberly Walters who kindly sent me this picture) learned how to make caraway comfits (layers of sugar around caraway seeds), how to use a wafer iron, how to make sugar plate, and the process of making 18th century cream ice (ice cream).  Historic London Town and Garden in Edgewater, Maryland sponsored the class.  Huzzah!!  We utilized three braziers and two comfit pans.  In the picture, one of the students is turning the pewter sabotiere in the coopered bucket for our refreshing Green Tea Cream Ice.

Heart to Hearth Cookery workshops can travel!  Both the Chocolate Workshop and Confectionery Workshop can travel to an historic site with a hearth.
Visit my website at www.hearttohearthcookery.com
 

Responses

  1. I have been interested in colonial ice cream making, but have not been able to determine what to use as the pewter sabotiere, let alone where to obtain one. I’ve noticed your pewter bowl in some of your ice cream blogs and have wondered if this is what you are using.

    • Dear Kyle,
      Thank you for your comment. Before I had my reproduction pewter sabotiere made, I used a pewter bowl in a pewter basin as described by Hannah Glasse in her “The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy” by a lady. If you go to my website, and look at my program page, you can see a picture of my pewter sabotierre. There are tin sabotierre’s also documented that could be used.

      Cook from the Heart! Susan


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