Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 20, 2017

Hutspot from a Capon Presented

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The Dutch receipt (recipe), To make a Hutspot from a Capon, consists of crumbs of White-bread, Cinnamon, Ginger, Saffron, Sugar, Marrow from Marrow-bones, Dates and slices of Lemon.  Pictured is the receipt presented on the table.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 19, 2017

Hutspot-Let it Stew

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After the pieces of Capon are well-done, the crumbs of White-bread, Cinnamon, Ginger, Saffron, Sugar, Marrow , Dates, and slices of lemon are combined with the Capon for the receipt (recipe), To make a Hutspot from a Capon; let it stew for half an hour in a pan.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 18, 2017

Marrow with Some Dates

img_2296-001 img_2276-005 For the Dutch receipt (recipe), To make a Hutspot from a Capon, after the Capon has been chopped into pieces and cooked well-donetake then crumbs of White-bread, Cinnamon, Ginger, Saffron, Sugar, and Marrow from Marrow-bones with some Dates from which the stones have been removed and slices of lemon.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 17, 2017

Capon-Into Pieces

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For the Dutch receipt (recipe), To make a Hutspot from a Capon, the Capon is first chopped into pieces, and then cooked in water until well done.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 16, 2017

Receipt for Capon

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For the Dutch receipt (recipe), To make a Hutspot from a Capon,  the first step is  Take a capon, which is a castrated domestic rooster fattened for eating.  Those of us that have plucked many roosters know that only one is necessary for a flock and the flesh needs to be stewed.  By castrating the males early, the flesh is much improved and more tender.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 13, 2017

Jerusalem Artichokes Served

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When the slices of Jerusalem Artichokes, onion, are fried with very fresh butter, salt, butter and vinegar are well fried for the receipt (recipe) of the same name Jerusalem Artichokes,  it is served with a little nutmeg.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 6, 2017

Fry with Very Fresh Butter

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After the Jerusalem artichokes have been roasted in the embers, and cut in slices, the next step for the French receipt (recipe) named, Jerusalem Artichokes, is to fry them with very fresh butter, an onion, salt, pepper and vinegar.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 5, 2017

After Well Baked

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After the Jerusalem artichokes have been well baked in the embers for the French receipt (recipe) with the same name, Jerusalem Artichokes, the directions state to pare and cut them in round slices.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 4, 2017

In the Embers

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The first step in the French receipt (recipe) for Jerusalem Artichokes is to bake them in the embers.  A fresh coal shovel full of glowing embers was laid on the hearth and the tubers rotated every so often until tender.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

 

Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | February 3, 2017

Jerusalem Artichokes

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The Jerusalem artichoke, (Helianthus tuberosus L.), also known as sunchoke, is a member of the sunflower family spreading by an edible tuber which is best harvested for food in late fall or winter.  These tubers I dug from my garden in January for the French receipt (recipe), Jerusalem Artichokes.

Visit my website for the listing of 2017 hearth cooking classes and workshops:  www.hearttohearthcookery.com

 

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