Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 27, 2014

And There’s Fire

IMG_9695-001   Kindling had been made ready prior to the use of the bow drill to create an ember and all that was required to start the fire was some consistent blowing.  See previous post fire from sticks to see the bow drill in action.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 25, 2014

Fire From Sticks

IMG_9690-003   After the cattail pollen was harvested, it was taken to the Lenape Village at Churchville Nature Center for bread.  A Lenape instructor provided a fire with her bow drill.   The picture shows her vigorously spinning the drill (a straight stick) with a bow (a stick that will bend to add cordage) to make an ember on a notched flat piece of wood that can be held down with the knee.  Smoke comes first before the important ember.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 24, 2014

From Many Cattails

IMG_9692-002   It takes harvesting the pollen from many cattails to obtain sufficient pollen for use.  The pollen can be dried in the sun to preserve the pollen  for a few months.  Two cattail flower heads with pollen are in the bark.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 23, 2014

A Gourd to Collect

IMG_9676-001  To collect the June cattail pollen, I used a large gourd bowl and bent the flower to tap the pollen into the container.  Cattail pollen is like talcum powder and needs to be collected so that air currents do not diminish your harvest.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 22, 2014

Gathering Cattail Pollen

IMG_9660-001    The cattail flower head has two distinct parts, a flower head, green cylinder in this picture that turns the characteristic brown, and the yellow pollen that is only seen sometime between May through July.  I am collecting cattail pollen in June.  Once the flower head is pollinated, the pollen stem withers away.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 21, 2014

Cherry Ice Cream-The Thousandth Post!

IMG_9788-001  With this picture looking into the interior of my sabotiere to see the finished product from the 1790 receipt (recipe) for Cherry Ice Cream, I have now posted one thousand blog posts!  Beginning in April 2009, I have been sharing “bites” of my journey with the experimental archaeology of food.  See previous posts for the steps in the preparation of this receipt.

 

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 20, 2014

National Ice Cream Day-2014

IMG_9785-001

The third Sunday in July is National Ice Cream Day!  The cream infused with cherries with one gill of syrup and the juice of the lemon is being poured into the sabotiere to prepare the receipt (recipe) for Cherry Ice Cream.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 19, 2014

Lemon for the Cherry

IMG_9784-001  The receipt (recipe) for Cherry Ice Cream directs to squeeze in one lemon.  The lemon was squeezed through the sieve to prevent any seeds or pulp from entering the pewter bason of the cherry infused cream.  Note the color change directly after the lemon juice was added.  Adding a squeezed lemon is very typical for 18th century ice cream receipts and most be done carefully and timely so the results are not curds.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 18, 2014

Pass Through a Sieve

IMG_9782-001  After the pounded cherries have had time to infuse flavor and color into the cream and sugar syrup mixture for the receipt (recipe) Cherry Ice Cream, the next step is to pass it through a sieve.  This removes all the cherry pulp, skins and stones.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | July 17, 2014

With One Gill

IMG_9781-001   The pounded cherries, stones and all, are mixed with one gill of syrup and a pint of cream for the receipt (recipe) Cherry Ice Cream.   A gill cup was used to measure the sugar syrup.

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