Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 29, 2014

Soak in Water

IMG_0019-001  After the pounded dried squash is sifted through the grape vine basket, those particles fine enough to pass through the basket are soaked in water until re-hydrated enough to be pliable to form a cake.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 28, 2014

Only the Finest

IMG_0018-001  Only the finest of the  particles of the pounded dried squash sift through the grape vine basket into the wood bowl for preparing a dried squash cake.

 

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 27, 2014

Grape Vine Basket

IMG_0015-001  The dried squash that has been pounded in the corn pounder is emptied into a grape vine basket to sieve out the larger squash pieces not suitable for the baked squash cakes.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 26, 2014

Pounding Dried Squash

IMG_0011-001  I am using my corn pounder for pounding dried squash as fine as possible.  Some of the finely ground squash is in the large carved wood bowl at my feet.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 25, 2014

The Symnel

IMG_0007-002  There were many varieties of Cucurbitaceae (squashes, pumpkin) that were grown by the Lenape.  Late summer and fall, the small new squash were harvested.  The grass basket contains the harvested squash preserved by drying.  The European word for the scalloped squash in the 17th century was symnel.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 21, 2014

To Pickle Pursland

IMG_9871-001  After the purslane has laid in the salt pickle for 24 hours for the receipt (recipe) To Pickle Pursland, then make another pickle, but not soe salt as ye former of white wine vinegar, put it in an earthern pot & put ye pursland to it.   The salt glazed crock is now ready to be sealed with the bladder of a pig.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 18, 2014

Pickle-Bears an Egg

IMG_9861-002   The first pickle for the receipt (recipe) To pickle pursland is made with salt & water as will bear an egge.   I am using a small salt glazed crock, as my quantity is demonstration size.  I filled the crock with water, added the egg which immediately sank to the bottom and then added salt slowly, stirring well after each addition, until the egg floated.  The boiled, tender purslane lays in this pickle for 24 hours.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 17, 2014

In Fayre Water

IMG_9864-001  For the receipt (recipe), To pickle pursland, the prepared stalks of the purslane are boyled in a kettle of fayre water without any salt until tender.  The purslane is being boiled in a hemispherical kettle.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 16, 2014

Gather Ye Pursland

IMG_9859-001  The receipt (recipe) found in the 17th century Custis family manuscript for To Pickle Pursland starts with  Gather ye pursland when it stalkie & will snap whn you break it.  The purslane that I gathered in the redware colander is “stalkie” and snaps.

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Posted by: hearttohearthcookery | September 15, 2014

Portulaca Oleracea

IMG_9856-001  Nicholas Culpepper, a 17th century physician, describes Garden Purslain (being used as a salad herb) as so well known that it needs no description.   Some of the other names for this common weed that has inexplicably fallen from favor are: Common purslane, pigweed, duckweed and Portulaca oleracea.  In the 17th and 18th century it was commonly eaten in salads and pickled.  The fleshy, succulent leaves and stems lay flat to the ground, and the plant grows almost everywhere.  Perhaps if I write as a dietitian, about the fact that it is a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids, alpha-linolenic acid, and Vitamin E, it will resurrect this highly nutritious, delicious green.

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